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MONTREAL -- Anthony Calvillo isnt sure where hell be when the Montreal Alouettes open training camp in June. He just knows that for the first time since 98 he wont be on the field in his teal-coloured No. 13 practice jersey throwing balls to S.J. Green, Jamel Richardson and the other receivers. The 41-year-old who rewrote the CFL record book for quarterbacks announced his retirement Tuesday following an illustrious 20-year career. Its an end Calvillo knew was coming when he missed the final 10 games of the regular season with a concussion. "My mind was pretty much made up at the end of the season that I wanted to retire," said Calvillo. "I went on holidays to think about it but I was 99 per cent sure. "In my mind Ive moved on. The process of being hurt helped me go through the transition. So when June comes around, I dont know where Ill be." Heisman Trophy winner Troy Smith, who got a crash course on Canadian football after signing with Montreal in August, is pegged as the new starter. Thats a position Calvillo held since 2000 after signing with the Alouettes as Tracy Hams understudy two years earlier. Calvillo leaves as pro footballs most prolific passer (79,816 yards) and the CFLs all-time leader in completions (5,892), attempts (9,437) and TD strikes (455). A spot in the Canadian Football Hall of Fame surely awaits. The five-time CFL all-star also holds records for completions in one game (44), most 300-yard contests (125) and 4,000-yard seasons (11). Calvillo also holds most Grey Cup game records, including passing yards (2,470). Calvillo led Montreal to eight Grey Cup appearances, winning in 2002, 2009 and 2010. Owner Robert Wetenhall called Calvillo a "good and decent man" who was "arguably one of the great players in the history of professional football." In a statement, CFL commissioner Mark Cohon called Calvillo "more than one of the greatest quarterbacks to ever play the game. He is one of the most remarkable people to ever grace our league." The Los Angeles native who has made Montreal his home wont be going far. Calvillo has a spot waiting for him on the Alouettes coaching staff, but he plans to take the summer off before looking at coaching in 2015. For now, he is working on two online courses to get the final credits he needs to complete the degree he started at Utah State University before he turned pro. He will also do a 180-hour internship in the Alouettes scouting department and front office for credit. He wants to finish his BA in general studies by April and bring his wife and two young daughters to Logan, Utah, for the graduation ceremony. Leaving due to injury was not how Calvillo expected to end his career but he found he wasnt enjoying the game or playing up to his own standards in his final season. Calvillo didnt play after suffering the second major concussion of his career on what looked like a routine hit by Saskatchewans Ricky Foley in a 24-21 loss on Aug. 17 in Regina. "The thing that stood out to me is that my tolerance to take a hit had gone down and the hit that caused it wasnt a hard hit," said Calvillo, now symptom-free. " That concerned me. "At the end of the day, I just didnt want to put my head at risk any more." Now, the Alouettes will see what life is like without the player who has long been the face of their franchise. "This organization has always put the right people in place, so I feel confident," Calvillo said. "To see what Troy Smith did in half a season, not knowing anything about this league, was very impressive." Jim Popp, who has been general manager since the team returned to Montreal in 1996, said the Alouettes got a taste of what life without Calvillo will be like during his injury. "Our locker room had to learn to function without Anthony," he said. "There was a real growing process for our veterans and our new players that were looking up to Anthony. "This is real, and weve got to take a step forward and depend on other people." Popp stepped in as head coach when Dan Hawkins was fired only five games into his first CFL season and is expected to remain in his dual role. But the team put out a release last week saying its still looking at head coaching candidates. Popp said Calvillo will likely begin as a quarterbacks or receivers coach in 2015. But Popp sees Calvillo being an offensive co-ordinator and head coach in the future. Calvillo was very emotional as he addressed the media and a large group of past and present Alouettes at his farewell news conference. Popp sobbed even more as he went over what the steady, six-foot-one quarterback meant to the organization. Calvillo was just 21 when he made his CFL debut with the Las Vegas Posse in 1994. He went to Hamilton the next season after the Posse folded but following three struggling campaigns with the Tiger-Cats, Calvillo joined the Alouettes in 1998. He was considering an offer from the Saskatchewan Roughriders but opted to sign with Montreal for the chance to learn from Ham. "The reason I did not sign with Saskatchewan is that I knew if I had another bad year that my career was over and I couldnt risk that," he said. "I wanted to take a step back and learn from an experienced quarterback." Injuries that forced Hams retirement put Calvillo into the starting lineup earlier than expected and he excelled from the outset. The winning seasons piled up, but it wasnt always easy. In 2007, he took the final five games of the season off to tend to his wife Alexia, who was diagnosed with B-cell lymphoma only a week after giving birth to their second daughter. Then in 2010, a cancerous lesion was found in Calvillos neck. Thankfully, the scare passed with successful surgery to remove his thyroid gland. Calvillo also endured criticism for not playing well in championship games. The Alouettes win in 2002 under coach Don Matthews was largely due to the clubs defence but the repeat championships in 2009-10 under Marc Trestman offered redemption. "I never gave up on myself," said Calvillo. "It was tough when you have spectacular regular seasons and then things dont work out for you in the playoffs, especially in championship games. "But I never doubted myself or quit. I refocused and got ready for the next year." Video messages from Trestman and Calvillos long time go-to receiver, Ben Cahoon, were played during the announcement. Guard Scott Flory said the Alouettes will have to learn to move on without Calvillo. "I got drafted in 1998 -- Cahoon went first and I was the next pick and we all showed up together," said the all-star guard. "When you have an opportunity to play with these amazing players, its just surreal. "You really appreciate what hes done. The legend will just grow." fake jerseys china .C. - Canadian ice dancing, it seems, is in good hands. cheap jerseys from china . Hamels threw seven sharp innings to earn his 100th career victory, Domonic Brown had a career-best five RBIs and the Philadelphia Phillies beat the Cincinnati Reds 12-1 on Saturday night to end a four-game losing streak. https://www.chinajerseysreplica.us/. Mladenovics quick hands at the net made the difference while Bencics inexperience in doubles showed. "We took a lot of pleasure," Mladenovic told Sport Plus television. "Its extremely difficult to play in such conditions, but our doubles team showed a lot of quality. cheap china jerseys . That little deal worked out in a big way for the Mavericks. Nowitzki had 21 points Tuesday night to pass Oscar Robertson for 10th on the NBAs career scoring list, leading the Mavs to a 95-83 victory over the Utah Jazz. replica jerseys china . Roma has a game in hand but now second place is even at risk for the capital side as Napoli moved to within three points with the win. "The result is not always fair," Roma coach Rudi Garcia said. "If we play like this until the end we will win many matches.MINSK, Belarus -- Three-thousand kilometres from where he grew up in Toronto, Geoff Platt couldnt have felt more at home. Moments after scoring and setting off another wild celebration at Minsk arena, Platt leapt into the arms of Belarusian captain Alexei Kalyuzhny. Not long after, fans were chanting his name. "Its an emotion that Im not sure Ive achieved ever in my career, just because of the atmosphere and the electricity in the building," Platt said. "It just runs through your veins and grabs a hold of you." Along with goaltender Kevin Lalande, Platt is one of two Canadian-born players representing host Belarus at the world hockey championship and playing major roles in what might be the best international showing in the countrys history. Led by Canadian-born coach Glen Hanlon, Belarus is in the quarter-finals for just the third time and the first since 2009. This is the biggest event Belarus has ever hosted, so Minsk has been partying for two weeks. And this team is giving locals another reason to celebrate. "You have to understand the magnitude (of) what this means to them," Hanlon said. "Its bigger than just a game. This is their chance to show everybody." By show everybody, Hanlon means the city, which is decked out in IIHF signs welcoming the world and reminding them in the form of giant bison mascots that hockey is happening here. Inside the 15,000-seat Minsk Arena, home of the KHLs Dynamo Minsk, good hockey has been happening for Belarus. Lalande, a native of Ottawa who plays for Dynamo and gained citizenship, has been stellar and Platt has added timely offence. But the Canadian imports want the credit to go to leading scorers Mikhail Grabovski and Sergei Kostitsyn. "Players are playing for this symbol, and it means a lot more to them to represent their country than probably a National Hockey League team or any club team around the world," Platt said, pointing to the Belarusian coat of arms on his chest. "Youre seeing that with Sergei Kostitsyn, Mikhail Grabovski just really taking their game to a level Im sure theyve almost never played at." Grabovski beamed with pride when talking about what this tournament means to him. Hes showing that to Hanlon, who first coached him as a 21-year-old at the world championships in Vienna in 2005. The Grabovski at this tournament is an other-worldly player. "I dont even look at Mikhail anymore because I know hes going to play great," Hanlon said. "I never get tired of saying, Good game, Mikhail." Hanlon is limited in what he can say to some of his players because of the language barrier. He understands Russian and Belarusian and is trying to learn to speak both languages, even though he doesnt have to. The former Washington Capitals coach and longtime NHL goaltender, whos in his second stint as coach of the Belarusian national team, has someone with him at almost all times who speaks English. At his news conferences with local media, the Brandon, Man., native answers in English, occasionally splicing in Belarusian words and pausing to let the interpreter next to him do his work. "Ive taken lessons, Ive done all of it," Hanlon said. "I have a better handle on it. Ive gone home here after every friendly tournament, so I take all my books, put them in my backpack like the college student on spring break and I end up dealing with my 12-year-old son and my wife and I sort of break away from it for a couple weeks." Hanlons wife and son still live in Vancouver, and because shes a teacher and hes a skier and hockey player they dont accompany him to Europe. "Hed rather play his own hockey than watch me coach," Hanlon said. Everyone in Belarus is watching Hanlon coach with keen interest. In Minsk, televisions all over the city have tournament games on, whether Belarus is playing or not. Inside Minsk Arena, one section is full of fans jumping up and down and doing chants normally reserved for soccer matches. Others whistle and fill the building with the kind of noise Lalande and Platt have no comparison for and Hanlon can only relate to the old Chicago Stadium. "When you go into somewhere like Beell Centre or Madison Square Garden, its pretty loud but it dies off after a while," Hanlon said.dddddddddddd "Here its sustained for the whole 2 1/2 hours of the game. Im not kidding: You cant hear a word down there. Im screaming and Im yelling at my players whos up and everything. "From before the game starts till after its over, its like a festival." Its a festival thats special to the Belarusian players, whether theyre from Novopolotsk in the north like Dmitry Korobov, or Ontario like Lalande and Platt. How they got here wasnt a matter of having Belarusian ancestry. Anyone who plays for Dynamo Minsk for two seasons is eligible for citizenship. "I got to keep my Canadian citizenship, so there wasnt really any downside," said Lalande, who began the tournament as a backup but has played too well for Hanlon not to start him. "At first it just made the travelling a lot easier in Russia, I didnt need a visa and saved a couple pages in my Canadian passport. But when Glen was named the head coach, we had a couple conversations together. He made it clear from the start that he wanted me to be a part of this." "Whether Id play or not he didnt know, but hes been very supportive. I owe everything to him for this chance." Lalande and Platt each praised the local players for accepting them while also noting theres a comfort level in having each other and an English-speaking coach around for this run. But Hanlon, who previously coached the Slovak national team, learned from his season with Jokerit in Finland that having Canadians on his team isnt easy. "Being an import coach you want to go out of your way so that the Canadians are respected," he said. "The last thing you want to do is look like youre favouring them." "So you want them to work for everything that they get, and I try to keep my space from them. I dont want to give anybody any reason to think that these players are going to get special treatment from me." No special treatment, but this experience has been special for Platt and Lalande, even though theyre not playing for their home country. Platt, who played 46 NHL games for the Columbus Blue Jackets and Anaheim Ducks, won a gold medal for Canada at the under-18 world championships in 2003. Platt hasnt represented Canada since and has moved on. "Not putting on the Canadian jersey now is just a chapter that sits in the past in my career," the 28-year-old said. "I was very fortunate to wear the Canadian jersey and win a gold medal at the under-18 level, and now this is a realistic goal to be playing with Belarus and to be competing at this level. Its really fun when were successful." Belarus was plenty successful in the preliminary round, going 4-3 to finish third in its group, ahead of Finland, Switzerland and Latvia and set up a quarter-final game against Sweden on Thursday night. Even if Sweden ends Belaruss run, the host teams performance wont be forgotten any time soon. When a victory over Latvia clinched a spot in the quarter-finals, Platt called it a "very rare opportunity for Belarusian ice hockey" that his teammates capitalized on. Lalande couldnt come up with words to describe his emotions. "We did it for ourselves because we believed," Lalande said, crediting fans who made a real impact on the team. "I think all of the Minsk and the whole countrys behind us right now. ... Were playing for us and were playing for them and its a tremendous feeling to be able to win in this fashion for them." Thats Hanlons priority, too. More than six years after being fired by the Capitals on U.S. Thanksgiving Day, he has no plans to return to coaching in the NHL and has invested a lot of time and energy on European hockey. Hanlon still keeps track of whats going on in North America and watches games because hes interested, but now the 57-year-old also checks on scores from leagues around Europe. Hes still a Canadian citizen, but the prospect of playing his native country doesnt mean anything to him anymore. "Whats special for me is winning for Belarus," Hanlon said. "Thats whats special." ' ' '

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